Elite Home Inspections: Tips on Hiring a Professional Inspector

Elite home inspections are called as such because they are conducted by trained and certified inspectors, not just by your local handyman or carpenter. Their knowledge surpasses that of assessing the conditions the different parts of the home, but also extends to knowledge of certain laws and regulations pertaining to building codes. Their overall inspection will help you as a homeowner decide whether you should buy the property or not. Even though there really is no house that can be deemed perfect, any buyer would definitely want one that has the least repair needs.

If you or any of your friends are in the process of buying a house, you may want to make use of the following tips when looking for a certified inspector.

Experience

No one becomes an expert on elite home inspections overnight. It takes years of experience and highly specialized training. Therefore, the first thing you should check is the how many years the inspector has been inspecting homes. The inspector assigned to your property should have experience with your type of home. Are you buying a single family residence or is it a condominium? Perhaps you are looking at a mobile home or manufactured property. Ask the inspector to provide you with a sample report of the same type of home that they have inspected in the past.

Certifications, Credentials, and Licenses

When speaking with a home inspection company, always ask for copies of their certifications and licenses. Anyone can claim that they are a certified inspector, but if there are no documents to back that up, then be wary. You can also check if they belong to a local home inspection association. These associations require inspectors to maintain a working knowledge of the latest building code. By testing their members regularly on industry standards homeowners are more likely to receive an inspector who knows what they are talking about and what to look for when inspecting properties of all types.

Sample of Report and Inspection Checklist

The reports made after elite home inspections often consist of 40 or more pages. This is because inspectors make sure that every detail is recorded for the future homeowner’s benefit. If the sample given to you has less than ten pages in it, then consider that as a red flag. Chances are, their inspectors do their jobs in a hurry and are not very detailed in their observations. To probe further, ask for a copy of the inspection checklist. It should include structural and mechanical components of the home. The plumbing system and electrical wirings should be there. Make sure they will be providing a mold inspection and termite inspection as part of their elite home inspection services.

Length of Inspection

When the inspector comes to your home, ask how long it would take him to do the job. This will vary depending on the size of the home, but it should at least take about three to four hours. If the inspector is done after an hour then you should be concerned because he may have done it in haste and has likely overlooked some defects. We have even heard of some companies doing “drive-by” inspections. Ideally you will want to be present at the inspection to avoid this scenario.

Communication

During the hiring process, select an inspector that communicates well. After all you are going to have many questions so you will want someone who responds professionally and knows how to articulate your homes issues. If it takes them several days to answer a simple query, then they may be as slow in providing you with the results later on or with accommodating your complaints, if you ever have one. Efficient property inspectors can often provide a report the day of the inspection.

Warranty

Finally, a good home inspection service must offer a warranty to the client. This warranty can be valid for 30, 60, or 90 days and, obviously, the lengthier the better. This will ensure that the inspector did his job seriously or he will be liable for any repairs that will transpire due to damages that he failed to report. These inspectors usually have an error and omission insurance that will cover this, although some will ask the client to sign a waiver to limit their liability. For your protection and to ensure that you are getting good value for the service that you hired, go with the inspection company that offers the best warranty.

Use these tips when you are looking for companies that will provide elite home inspections for you or for the people you know. This guide is a surefire way to ensure that you get the best professional out there.

Older Home Inspection Tips – Replace Your Knob and Tube Wiring

One area of significant concern with older home inspection is the wiring. During the period between 1930 and 1950, when household demands for electricity were much lower, most home wiring included a type of wiring called knob and tube. Today’s homes use much more current to run all of the newer appliances families require to live a comfortable lifestyle. In older homes with this type of wiring fires are much more of a risk.

A simple trip to the basement of your house can reveal if you have this type of current system. If you see white knobs attached to the joists with wires running through them, chances are this is knob and tube wiring. The knobs acted as insulators from objects while the ceramic tubing provided the support for wires as they travel through floor joists.

Older home inspection today requires catching this type of wiring system with recommendations of complete replacement in order to avoid costly or life threatening fires. This includes replacement of not only the fuses but the wires as well. Simply put, If you upgrade the panel, then replace the wiring as well.

An important side note is that a lot of insurance companies will not write or renew policies where there is existing knob and tube wiring. Nothing can be more frustrating than finding out your proud real estate purchase will not be covered prior to closing.

Rather than hoping your house passes inspection, make sure your professional older home inspection includes the wiring system and recommendations for replacement before it causes undue headache.

Home Inspection Tip – Five Home Maintenance Areas That Can Snag the Sale of Your Home

The last thing you want when you’re selling your home is to discover problems that could jeopardize the sale. While a home inspection will reveal the condition of your home, you won’t have to be afraid of issues that come up if you’ve kept your home well maintained. With good home maintenance you can avoid some of the most common imperfections and problems found by home inspectors.

Home maintenance tasks are often put off for various reasons, such as lack of time, lack of money, or simply lack of interest. However, when it comes time to sell your home and you know buyers are looking, it’s time to take care of business.

The little things that nag you may be major issues to a prospective home buyer, and they could cost you the sale. You can eliminate the vast majority of problems and stress by checking on five important areas.

1. Dirty filter and coils in the furnace, air conditioning or heat pump system. Having your heating and cooling system serviced by a professional once a year should take care of this problem. You should also clean or replace filters every one to three months, depending on the requirements of your system. This is important for long life of your unit, efficiency, fuel savings, and the assurance you’ll have proper heating and cooling in your home.

2. Poor Caulking of Ceramic Tile in the Tub and Shower Area. It can cost thousands of dollars to repair or replace a rotted shower wall. You can avoid this by caulking tiled areas for a few dollars. If you can see a crack in the calk or grout, you know it’s large enough for water to get in.

3. Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters (GFCI) not Functioning properly. Those electrical outlets with the “Press” and “Test” buttons are GFCI’s. They’re very important in reducing or preventing the chance of electrocution. Push the “Test” button to see if the GFCI’s are working as they should. If not, they’re inexpensive to replace and should only take about fifteen minutes to install. If you have questions or concerns, call a professional electrician.

4. Wood rot. This is a big one, and it can snag the sale of your home. What inspector wouldn’t love to report that a home is free of wood rot and structural damage? Selling your home can be made simpler and more enjoyable if you are knowledgeable about preventative maintenance. For example, have a good moisture barrier under the crawl space. Keep an eye out for leaks around windows, doors and the roof.

5. Amateur Workmanship. Did you weekend handyman brother-in-law help you remodel the kitchen last year? When amateurs do home projects, often the materials used aren’t right for the intended purpose, or they’re of poor quality, or both. Inspections are seldom performed or permits obtained when such projects are done by amateurs. Unfortunately amateur work can complicate a closing.

Be sure to keep your home in good shape to make things go smoothly for your home inspector and for the selling process as a whole. You’ll be glad you did.